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Serif Software and the future of low end software

Last post 12-06-2016, 1:26 by gjslaw. 9 replies.
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  •  03-28-2016, 8:42 709013

    Serif Software and the future of low end software

    If anyone here uses Serif software, then they will probably already know that they are no longer going to develop any of their current range of Windows software (DrawPlus, PagePlus, and so on). The are going to concentrate on the new Infinity range they developed on the Mac, but issuing Windows versions as they become ready.

    There will be no replacements for WebPlus and (relevant here) MoviePlus

    The interesting thing about the announcement for me was this statement:

    We had concerns over some very important areas of the business at that time – particularly with channels such as retail becoming increasingly tough for software – and outside of those channels we felt it to be very important to increase market share in the creative professional market.

    To me that seems to indicate that little or no money is being made from low end products being bought off shelves. Even people buying actual boxes are probably getting them from Amazon. This makes me wonder where Corel are going with their business model.

    On a personal note, as I use two Serif products heavily - WebPlus and PagePlus - I've been looking around. There doesn't seem to be any serious software around other than Adobe, and that's going to cost a fortune - even just getting Dreamweaver is £200 a year. Waiting for Serif to issue their publishing program means I've have to start my projects from scratch anyway, so. If anyone has any recommendations for either task?

  •  03-28-2016, 11:15 709018 in reply to 709013

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    I have no recommendations for replacements, but I kind of figured the profit margins on low cost consumer software was not high. And yes, Corel does fit into this business model. I do wonder what is the dowload vs hard copy count is. I am guessing with everyone turning to the internet more and more (as the next generation becomes net dependent), "retail" boxes will be a thing of the past.

     

  •  03-28-2016, 14:52 709024 in reply to 709018

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    As for WebPlus, Xara Web Designer 11 from Magix might be something to look at.

    I've used an older version of it that called Web Designer MX Premium at that time.

    Link

    They also have a Page & Layout Disigner product.

    Link_2

  •  03-28-2016, 15:50 709032 in reply to 709024

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    My web design limit is Wordpress.....
  •  03-28-2016, 16:06 709036 in reply to 709024

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    Thanks Paul, I had overlooked Magix. Their software doesn't seem to get included in many reviews. I'll certainly check out the free trial.
  •  03-29-2016, 16:27 709084 in reply to 709036

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    Jeff, I've been a long-time Serif user which has always had some interesting software.  Were you invited to beta test the new Windows Infinity range?  It looks like there will be a public beta. 

    As for replacement software, you may want to check out Ashampoo, a very similar company to Serif.   I've never used their website software, but it's so cheap, it may be worth checking out.  And they usually give a full trial but WebSite X5 is a "partner" software, so not sure about a trial.

  •  03-31-2016, 8:46 709184 in reply to 709084

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    Thanks for the suggestion Greg. I did sign up for the Affinity beta, so look forward to that, but the publishing program is some way off.
  •  12-02-2016, 17:22 726579 in reply to 709184

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    It was a very sad day for me when this news broke. For many years I have used their excellent 'Plus' range of products (WebPlus, MoviePlus, DrawPlus, PagePlus, PhotoPlus, PanoramaPlus,etc) and regularly updated each to the latest version. I liked the fact that I wasn't spending a fortune for world-class functionality rivaling other products considered to be 'industry standard' but bordering on being unafordable for people like me. Fortunately, these Serif products will still work well into the foreseeable future, as long as Microsoft doesn't clobber windows such that they are no longer compatible.

    The only positive thing I can think of is that the, albeit polite, regular marketing phone calls will now stop.  

  •  12-02-2016, 23:09 726597 in reply to 726579

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    Having now looked at both Infinity Designer and Photo, I'm much more encouraged by Serif's move. Both programs seem very good at what they do, and at a very good price. I'm obviously going to have to wait quite a bit longer to see what the publishing program is like, and will miss them not having a website designer, but starting again has led to two very powerful apps already.

    I wonder if there is ever going to be a new consumer level video editing program designed from scratch. Avid Studio was that, but the design concept has been lost because of the way Corel are tinkering with it.

  •  12-06-2016, 1:26 726774 in reply to 726597

    Re: Serif Software and the future of low end software

    jjn:

    I wonder if there is ever going to be a new consumer level video editing program designed from scratch. Avid Studio was that, but the design concept has been lost because of the way Corel are tinkering with it.

    I seriously doubt it - but who knows?

    The real question is whether there is even a market for a new editor at the enthusiast level which is what I think you are talking about.  There seems to be plenty of cheap new editors that perform the functions that most "consumers" feel they need.  We are living in a social media world where 30 seconds of video (max) from an increasingly capable smart phone camera is about the limit of an audience's attention span.  Indeed, I suspect that more video and photos have been shot with camera phones in the past couple of years than all media in the rest of recorded history.

    I keep reading about the demise of the consumer DSLR, although quality cameras will obviously continue for the professionals.  So why would most people lug around another device when their hand-held phone can produce quality results that can be instantly posted on Instagram etc.  

    But don't give up hope.  This holiday season, I have been bombarded by photo editor offerings that, if not new, are interesting updates.  And I have actually purchased a new editor (On1 Photo RAW) that has been built from the ground up to overcome some of the recognized deficiencies in Lightroom, and it also works as a plug-in for both Photoshop and Lightroom.  So, yes, there are still some talented developers out there, but given the consolidations in the video market, and the needs of the market itself, I fear that any quality new enthusiast products can only serve a small niche area. 

    BTW, @Jeff (Sparks) - good to see your face pop up again.  Cool

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