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Pinnacle Studio 16 optimized for 64 bit, what does that mean?

  •  08-31-2012, 16:28

    Pinnacle Studio 16 optimized for 64 bit, what does that mean?

     

    Pinnacle Studio 16 optimized for 64 bit, what does that mean?

    This question has been asked many times on this forum.

    Follows a compilation I made using posts that contribute to answering this question.

    For convenience sake I didn’t add names of the posters except for the posts by mpingel who is a Corel/Pinnacle employee.

     

    Here it goes:

     

    I had sent an Email to the customer support for the videoguys website inquiring into what 64 bit optimization means and asking for hardware recommendations since i am about to buy a new laptop for HD video editing on PS 16. Hardware Questions were relating to what gives me the most bang for my buck with the upgrade options for the HP dv 7t Quad Edition Ivy Bridge.

    1) 2.3 Gz i7 vs. 2.6 Gz i7 ($175 upgrade)

    2) 1 GB NVidia Ge Force 630 at GDDR3 vs 2 GB Nvidia Ge Force 650 at GDDR5. ($125 upgrade) Both with CUDA support

    3) What 64 bit optimization means in Studio 16

    On the hardware side he indicated the CPU upgrade probably more important than the GPU, but definitely want a good CUDA card. Unfortunately the specific one he recommended is not an option.

    Regarding 64 bit optimization he said the following: Yes Pinnacle studio 16 is avid studio 2. It is not 64 bit native code, but it will tap into the extra ram and give better performance under Win 7 64 bit mode.

    I'm not a software engineer and I didn't think that was possible, but perhaps it is. Maybe our experts in that regard could shed some light on this hopefully.

     

    Answer by mpingel:

     

    If you use Pinnacle Studio 16 under 32bit Windows, it can use 2 GB application memory. A 32bit OS can be tuned (“4-gigabyte tuning feature”) so that the application can use 3GByte, but this can affect the overall performance.

    Under a 64bit Windows, Pinnacle Studio 16 can use 4GB for each process. This requires some additional optimization work regarding memory allocation and testing that all software components can handle 4GB.

     

    I'm sorry, I don't understand what 4gb for each process means. What specifically is a process within the context of ps16? I suppose the nitty gritty is how much additional ram on a system is helpful specifically for ps 16. I.e is anything more than 4gb wasted. Or can it use 4gb per CPU core? Or something else? I presume that additional ram will help when multitasking with multiple programs open, but I rarely do that when editing.

    If I understand the explanation correctly, it reminds me of Adobe CS where each "app" that you use in the program takes ram for itself as if it was a separate program running. So, having more ram makes the task easier instead of being stuck with the limit of 32bit programs.

    RAM is dirt cheap now. I use several programs at a time when editing. Having that extra RAM speeds things along for me.

    Just curious, how much RAM is being used on some of your systems out there with no programs (outside of anti-virus stuff) running?

    When I boot up to the desktop, I am using about 2.2gigs of ram. I have MS Security Essentials, some apps running that monitor GPU, CPU, HD, and internet accessing. Most everything else in MSCONFIG startup is disabled. Using the system listed below. For me, if I opened up PS16, I can see where I would be running close to the edge with just 4gigs of RAM.

     

    I'm sorry, I don't understand what 4gb for each process means

    I don't want to tread on Mpingle's toes here, but I do want to encourage him to explain more.

    If I look at the running processes when using PS16, there are normally at least 2, perhaps 3 running that belong to PS16. NGStudio, BGRender and RM (render manager, I think). So on a 32 bit computer they all have to fit into 2GB, or possibly 3?

    Would it be true to say that on a 64-bit system, because PS16 is optimised to use 64-bit even though the program code will run on 32-bit, each of the processes can use up to 4GB of space, if it is available and if they need it?

     

    Answer by mpingel:

     

    msalz:

    I'm sorry, I don't understand what 4gb for each process means.

    I do not want to get too much into the technical details, but to answer the question: Each of the processes of Pinnacle Studio (e.g. BGRnd.exe, NGStudio.exe, RM.exe, …) could use up to 4GB. So in total, Pinnacle Studio would use more than 4GB.

     

    msalz:

    That's interesting. It never accesses more than 1.6 GB of RAM total? Maybe there are other circumstances when it can and does. Hopefully mpingel will shed more light on this since he is an employee so people will know if adding more RAM to their systems will aid PS 16's performance. (Clearly it will help if people multitask or use other 64 bit programs, but my purpose in this inquiry is limited to effects on PS 16).

    Answer by mpingel:

     

    In general, the memory usage of Pinnacle Studio 16 is lower than that of Avid Studio 1, but it surely uses more than 1.6 GB in some cases.

    An above average project with several AVCHD clips and some effects (esp. Montage) will need more than 2 GB during export.
    Under a 32 bit Windows, the export might stop with a warning that you do not have enough memory.

    Under 64 bit Windows, Pinnacle Studio can claim up to 4 GB during export. If you only have 4GB of RAM installed and other programs run, Windows will swap memory to hard disk and you will notice a performance decrease.

    To sum it up: I would recommend using a 64bit Windows with at least 4GB RAM (better 6GB) installed.

     

    mpingel:

    In general, the memory usage of Pinnacle Studio 16 is lower than that of Avid Studio 1, but it surely uses more than 1.6 GB in some cases.

    I did a test yesterday evening :

    A PIP of 5 moving clips (= with keyframes) of AVCHD rushs. I applied to each clip a Maget Bullet Look, fractal fire and a Red Giant Knoll or Trapcode Particular. All this exported in 1080 50p AVCHD 24 Mbits, Dolby 5.1 for the sound.

    Framerate rendering was rather slow = less than 5 fps, sometimes lower. RAM use never exceeded 1.5 GB (NGStudio + RM + BGR). I didn't check CPU Cores. See my specs in my profile if you want. I can say that my computer is rather highend.

     

    saby:

    A PIP of 5 moving clips (= with keyframes) of AVCHD rushs. I applied to each clip a Maget Bullet Look, fractal fire and a Red Giant Knoll or Trapcode Particular. All this exported in 1080 50p AVCHD 24 Mbits, Dolby 5.1 for the sound.

    Framerate rendering was rather slow = less than 5 fps, sometimes lower. RAM use never exceeded 1.5 GB (NGStudio + RM + BGR). I didn't check CPU Cores. See my specs in my profile if you want. I can say that my computer is rather highend.

    I'm ready to make more tests if you want.

    Answer by mpingel:

     

    If the effects are rendered in the background, you will not see a high RAM usage during export.
    You provoke me to give a more technical explanation
    : The main advantage using a 64bit OS is a greater address space and a reduced memory fragmentation. This allows to render more files in parallel.

    If you could check (you would need a developer version of Studio to limit to 2GB or a 32bit OS on the same system) you would see that the export of a project with multiple clips is slower, because the clips can not be rendered in parallel.


    In a similar way, background rendering during editing behaves different for 32bit and 64bit Windows.

    I hope this makes clear that "64bit optimized" is not just a marketing phrase.

     

    Thanks mingle for the explanation. I have a better understanding now though it will never be a full understanding, but that's a me problem, not a you problem. Everyone can see what the minimum recommended specs for ps 16 are, but we all know from experience that exceeding the specs certainly helps. Clearly more ram helps, but seems anything over 6 gb will have no or at least diminishing returns. My final question, when it comes to better CPU clock speeds (assuming quad i7). Vs better gpu speed and size (assuming cuda support) is one more important than the other? Thanks again.

     

     

    Hope this comes out as intented.

    Added: The above info was copied from this thread.

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