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Old DVD too fast in some players

Last post 01-25-2021, 10:58 by krc. 10 replies.
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  •  01-23-2021, 19:35 811035

    Old DVD too fast in some players

    I have dozens of DVDs that I created about 5 - 15 years ago using older versions of Pinnacle Studio (mostly versions 11 - 16). Roughly ten percent of these disks do not play properly in the Blu-Ray / DVD player in my basement (which is where I'd like to watch them, since that is where the exercise equipment lives...). The problem is that they play at super-speed. Video is at least 2-4 times normal, with high-pitched "chipmunk" voices in the audio. All of the disks play normally if I insert them into the Blu-Ray / DVD drive in my desktop computer.

    That computer now has a brand-new installation of Pinnacle Studio version 24. My question is:  Can I use this version of Pinnacle to read in the contents from the existing DVDs, and ... do something ... to them in order to burn new versions that will run at the proper speed on all players?

    Thanks,
      krc

  •  01-24-2021, 2:06 811039 in reply to 811035

    Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    The culprit is the DVD Player in your basement.
  •  01-24-2021, 13:55 811071 in reply to 811039

    Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    Can you explain why this only happens with about 10% of the disks?

    Can you explain why commercially created disks don't misbehave in the same player? 

     Is there a list of players that work properly with disks created by Pinnacle? 

  •  01-24-2021, 14:36 811074 in reply to 811071

    Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    krc:

    Can you explain why this only happens with about 10% of the disks?

    Can you explain why a PC DVD player can read them correctly ?

    krc:

     Is there a list of players that work properly with disks created by Pinnacle? 

    No, there is not. Pinnacle Studio produces DVD compliant to Video DVD standard.

  •  01-24-2021, 14:57 811075 in reply to 811074

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    I would love to believe that, as you say, "Pinnacle Studio produces DVD compliant to Video DVD standard.". The difficulty I have is that there is no way for me to perform in independent confirmation. I have no doubt that Samsung, who made the player in the basement, will also claim to adhere to the standard. But the standard is proprietary, and they will only sell a copy of it for JPY550,000 (currently about $5300) to someone who signs a non-disclosure agreement. 

    So, all I can do is look at the empirical data and conclude that "Pinnacle produces some disks that do not work in some players." 

    Before I asked this question, I searched the forum. I found a similar question dating back to 2008, where the answer suggested that there might be a bug in v11 (which was used for some of my DVDs) and that it might be possible to re-import the video from the disk into Pinnacle and somehow (by magic? details were minimal or unclear) burn a new disk that would work. At some point, I will try that. But it would be nice to know if anyone has had (and solved!) this problem before. And it would be of even more help if someone cold say if there was anything special required other than import-and-burn-anew.

  •  01-24-2021, 15:04 811077 in reply to 811075

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    krc:

    So, all I can do is look at the empirical data and conclude that "Pinnacle produces some disks that do not work in some players." 

    It's more likely that time has deteriorated datas stored in these DVD and/or the player capacity to read them.

    Depending on storage conditions, the chemichal dye in the DVD may vanish or drip. Player diode may see its optical capacities reduce as well.

     

    It's always possible to import these DVDs in a modern version of Studio. You'll get .mpg files. Insert each mpg file in a project and burn a DVD.

  •  01-24-2021, 15:09 811078 in reply to 811075

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    krc:
    And it would be of even more help if someone cold say if there was anything special required other than import-and-burn-anew.
    No, I doubt if there is. If every post that was made in this forum had to give a blow by blow account about how to carry out every single suggestion then it would have burnt out its server some time ago :-)

    No software produces discs that work in all players burnt using any burner because some players won't even play burnt DVDs (including Xboxes, it seems....). Although your can "fake" the discs to look like pressed DVDs, you need a particular type of burner and bitsetting software and even then the player might not be fooled.

    Have you got a link to the post your are quoting?

  •  01-24-2021, 16:41 811080 in reply to 811078

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    jjn:

    No software produces discs that work in all players burnt using any burner because some players won't even play burnt DVDs (including Xboxes, it seems....). Although your can "fake" the discs to look like pressed DVDs, you need a particular type of burner and bitsetting software and even then the player might not be fooled.

    Have you got a link to the post your are quoting?

    I don't have a link (though I think the search was just "DVD plays too fast"), and tracking down a 12-year-old post is guaranteed to be less useful than a 12-year-old scotch. And I think the earlier part of your answer is related to my skepticism about a verifiable "DVD standard". 

    In any event, here's my report on the crudest update on my initial attempt. If I really do the naïve steps of (1) "import from DVD" to get an MPG file and then (2) just "Burn to disk", I get a disk that actually works in the player in the basement. 

    But I've worked as an academic scientist long enough to know the hard truth that every answer brings on another question. Here the problem is that the import only gets the video, and does not get the DVD titles and menus (which were, of course, originally produced by some version of Pinnacle, according to their current understanding of the standard). 

    Is there a way to import the existing DVD along with its menus and titles? Or, since I haven't edited the imported video, is there way to simply copy the existing titles and menus directly in some way?

    (If I figure things out myself, I'll post back to this thread so the next person with this problem can see what worked for me.

  •  01-24-2021, 18:32 811084 in reply to 811080

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    ....

    Is there a way to import the existing DVD along with its menus and titles? Or, since I haven't edited the imported video, is there way to simply copy the existing titles and menus directly in some way?

    (If I figure things out myself, I'll post back to this thread so the next person with this problem can see what worked for me.

    It might be possible to create an ISO file using a third party program like Imgburn. That will make an exact copy of the disc on your hard drive, including all the titles and menus. You can then use Imgburn to burn a new disc.

     Joe

  •  01-25-2021, 3:59 811089 in reply to 811084

    Re: Re:Old DVD too fast in some players

    loosecannon:

    ....

    Is there a way to import the existing DVD along with its menus and titles? Or, since I haven't edited the imported video, is there way to simply copy the existing titles and menus directly in some way?

    (If I figure things out myself, I'll post back to this thread so the next person with this problem can see what worked for me.

    It might be possible to create an ISO file using a third party program like Imgburn. That will make an exact copy of the disc on your hard drive, including all the titles and menus. You can then use Imgburn to burn a new disc.

     Joe

    If the disc have been made by a bugged program, the copy will still have the bug, I would have thought. If the disc is corrupt due to age, then ImgBurn won't be able to read it. Worth a try though -

    http://pinnaclestudioinfo.dtvpro.co.uk/burning-discs-with-imgburn

    Covers the basics, including downloading the program (which triggers some virus checkers). Creating and Using ISOs can be achieved from the EX-Picker menu.

  •  01-25-2021, 10:58 811122 in reply to 811084

    Re: Old DVD too fast in some players

    loosecannon:

    It might be possible to create an ISO file using a third party program like Imgburn. That will make an exact copy of the disc on your hard drive, including all the titles and menus. You can then use Imgburn to burn a new disc.

     Joe

     Thanks for the suggestion. I tired (using a different program than Imgburn) the "copy to ISO and then burn" technique. Unfortunately, it really does create an exact copy, and the player in the basement still insists on playing everything at hyperspeed.

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